The Euro+Med PlantBase - the information resource for Euro-Mediterranean plant diversity

Euro+Med Plantbase integrates and critically evaluates information from Flora Europaea, Med-Checklist, the Flora of Macaronesia, and from regional and national floras and checklists from the area as well as additional taxonomic and floristic literature. This is complemented by the European taxa of several families taken from the World Checklist of Selected Plant Families and of the Leguminosae from the International Legume Database and Information Service ILDIS (see credits for details). By 1st of February 2018 it provides access to the total European flora of vascular plants in 222 plant families.
 








Details for: Acacia farnesiana

Source: ILDIS World Database of Legumes 2010. (copyright © ILDIS).

Name: Acacia farnesiana (L.) Willd.
Nomencl. ref.: Sp. Pl. 4: 1083. 1806
Rank: Species
Status: ACCEPTED
Taxonomy (this taxon is included in): Regnum - Plantae
     Divisio - Tracheophyta
          Subdivisio - Spermatophytina
               Class - Magnoliopsida
                    Superordo - Rosanae
                         Ordo - Fabales Bromhead
                              Familia - Fabaceae Lindl.
                                   Tribus - Acacieae
                                        Genus - Acacia Mill.
                                            
Basionym: Mimosa farnesiana L.
Homotypic synonyms: Mimosa farnesiana L.
Synonyms: Acacia acicularis Willd.
Acacia indica (Poir.) Desv.
Acacia lenticellata F. Muell.
Acacia minuta (M. E. Jones) R. M. Beauch.
Farnesia odora Gasp.
Farnesiana odora Gasp.
Mimosa acicularis Poir.
Mimosa indica Poir.
Mimosa suaveolens Salisb.
Pithecellobium acuminatum M. E. Jones
Pithecellobium minutum M. E. Jones
Poponax farnesiana (L.) Raf.
Vachellia farnesiana (L.) Wight & Arn.
Acacia minuta (M. E. Jones) R. M. Beauch. subsp. minuta
Acacia farnesiana var. lenticellata (F. Muell.) Bailey
 
Comments: A perfume is extracted from the flowers., An 'absolute' extracted from flowers for aromatherapy., and subtropical America, Africa and Asia, often being naturalised., Believed to have been introduced to Australia before European settlement, from, Central America (where it is native) via Philippines. Also found in tropical, Native of Trop. America, widely naturalised & often planted., Origin uncertain, probably South American., Possibly intentionally introduced, but probably native sea-introduced., Used, with care, for skin care and nervous system in aromatherapy.
Common names: acacia de Indias (Spanish, Castillian), Acacia Jaune (), Acacia Odorant (), acácia-de-Dioscórides (Portuguese), aroma (Spanish, Castillian), Aroma Amarilla (), aromer (Catalan), aromer (Majorcan), aromo (Spanish, Castillian), aromo común (Spanish, Castillian), Ban Baburi (), Bayahonda (), cachia (Portuguese), Cambron (), Carambomba (), carambuco (Majorcan), carambuco (Spanish, Castillian), Cashia (), Cassie (English), Cassie Flower (English), Cassie Jaune (French), Cassis Commun (French), copos (Spanish, Castillian), Cuji Aroma (), Ellington Curse (), Epinard (), Espino Blanco (), esponja (Portuguese), Esponjeira (), esponjeira (Portuguese), esponjeira amarella (Portuguese), esponjeira farnesia (Portuguese), Fleur De Cassier (), flor de esponjeira (Portuguese), Fragrant Acacia (), likalea (Euskera), likurta (Euskera), Mimosa (), mimosa (Spanish, Castillian), Opopanax (), Opoponax (), Pauji (), Popinac (), Prickly Moses (), Sponge Tree (English), Sweet Acacia (English), Sweet Cassia (English), Vaivaivakavotona (), Zakasya ()[Credits]
Conservation Status: Not Threatened
Maps: distribution
Occurrence: [Ga(F) Hs(S) Ir It Le Si(S) Sy]
Use: Chemical products, Domestic, Environmental, Food and Drink, Forage, Medicine, Miscellaneous, Weed, Wood


  Display software last updated: January 2011
© Botanic Garden and Botanical Museum Berlin-Dahlem 2006, Imprint